Lateral transpsoas fusion: indications and outcomes

ScientificWorldJournal. 2012;2012:893608. doi: 10.1100/2012/893608. Epub 2012 Nov 6.

Abstract

Spinal fusion historically has been used extensively, and, recently, the lateral transpsoas approach to the thoracic and lumbar spine has become an increasingly common method to achieve fusion. Recent literature on this approach has elucidated its advantage over more traditional anterior and posterior approaches, which include a smaller tissue dissection, potentially lower blood loss, no need for an access surgeon, and a shorter hospital stay. Indications for the procedure have now expanded to include degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, degenerative scoliosis, nonunion, trauma, infection, and low-grade spondylolisthesis. Lateral interbody fusion has a similar if not lower rate of complications compared to traditional anterior and posterior approaches to interbody fusion. However, lateral interbody fusion has unique complications that include transient neurologic symptoms, motor deficits, and neural injuries that range from 1 to 60% in the literature. Additional studies are required to further evaluate and monitor the short- and long-term safety, efficacy, outcomes, and complications of lateral transpsoas procedures.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Equipment Design
  • Humans
  • Prostheses and Implants*
  • Psoas Muscles / surgery*
  • Spinal Diseases / surgery*
  • Spinal Fusion / instrumentation*
  • Spinal Fusion / methods*
  • Spine / surgery*
  • Treatment Outcome