Sit-stand desks in call centres: associations of use and ergonomics awareness with sedentary behavior

Appl Ergon. 2013 Jul;44(4):517-22. doi: 10.1016/j.apergo.2012.11.001. Epub 2012 Dec 4.

Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether or not use of sit-stand desks and awareness of the importance of postural variation and breaks are associated with the pattern of sedentary behavior in office workers.

Method: The data came from a cross-sectional observation study of Swedish call centre workers. Inclinometers recorded 'seated' or 'standing/walking' episodes of 131 operators over a full work shift. Differences in sedentary behavior based on desk type and awareness of the importance of posture variation and breaks were assessed by non-parametric analyses.

Results: 90 (68.7%) operators worked at a sit-stand desk. Working at a sit-stand desk, as opposed to a sit desk, was associated with less time seated (78.5 vs 83.8%, p = 0.010), and less time taken to accumulate 5 min of standing/walking (36.2 vs 46.3 min, p = 0.022), but no significant difference to sitting episode length or the number of switches between sitting and standing/walking per hour. Ergonomics awareness was not associated with any sedentary pattern variable among those using a sit-stand desk.

Conclusion: Use of sit-stand desks was associated with better sedentary behavior in call centre workers, however ergonomics awareness did not enhance the effect.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Awareness
  • Chi-Square Distribution
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Ergonomics*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Interior Design and Furnishings*
  • Male
  • Occupational Health
  • Posture / physiology*
  • Sedentary Behavior*
  • Statistics, Nonparametric
  • Sweden
  • Workplace*