Elevated risk of asthma after hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus infection in infancy

Paediatr Respir Rev. 2013 Jan;13 Suppl 2:S9-15. doi: 10.1016/S1526-0542(12)70161-6.

Abstract

Severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in infancy is associated with substantial morbidity worldwide; whether it is a risk factor for childhood asthma is contentious. A systematic review of 28 articles was conducted, summarizing estimates of asthma risk after RSV hospitalization during infancy. Prevalence estimates of asthma, among those hospitalized for RSV in infancy, were from 8% to 63%, 10% to 92%, and 37%, at ages <5, 5 to 11, and ≥ 12 years, respectively. These rates were higher than those among non-hospitalized comparisons. The attributable risk of asthma due to RSV ranged from 13% to 22% and from 11% to 27% among children aged ≤ 5 and aged 5 to 11, respectively, and was 32% among children ≥ 12 years of age. Overall, 59% of asthma prevalence estimates from those previously hospitalized for RSV exceeded 20%, compared to only 6% of non-hospitalized comparison estimates. Despite variability in asthma prevalence estimates after RSV-related hospitalization, available data suggest a link between severe RSV infection in infancy and childhood asthma.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review
  • Systematic Review

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Asthma / epidemiology*
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Hospitalization / statistics & numerical data*
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections / epidemiology*
  • Risk Factors
  • Severity of Illness Index