Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 148 (2-3), 235-42

Intelligence, Temperament, and Personality Are Related to Over- Or Under-Reporting of Affective Symptoms by Patients With Euthymic Mood Disorder

Affiliations

Intelligence, Temperament, and Personality Are Related to Over- Or Under-Reporting of Affective Symptoms by Patients With Euthymic Mood Disorder

Eun Young Kim et al. J Affect Disord.

Abstract

Background: Many patients with mood disorders report subjective indicators of depression that are inconsistent with clinicians' objective ratings. This study used the self-report Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI) and the observer-rated Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) to evaluate the extent to which temperament, personality traits, and clinical characteristics accounted for discrepancies between self-reports and clinician ratings of depressive symptoms in patients experiencing the euthymic period of a mood disorder.

Method: The sample consisted of 100 individuals with bipolar disorder (n=72) or major depressive disorder (n=28). The HAMD and Young Mania Rating Scale were administered, and participants completed the BDI and Barratt Impulsivity Scale. Intelligence was assessed with the Korean Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. Patients completed the Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Autoquestionnaire and the NEO-Five-Factor Inventory.

Results: The BDI and HAMD were significantly but modestly correlated with each other (r=0.319, p<0.001). Lower intelligence and a less conscientious personality were independent contributors to differences between Z-scores for the BDI and the HAMD. Higher impulsivity and a more anxious temperament were also observed in the group that self-reported more symptoms than were noted by clinicians.

Limitations: Generalizability of results can be limited in ethnic difference.

Conclusions: Subjective and objective assessments of the depressive symptoms of patients with mood disorders in a euthymic mood state are frequently discordant. Clinicians should consider the subjective aspects of depressive symptoms along with objective information about the influence of intelligence and personality on patients' self-reports.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 1 article

Publication types

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback