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Gold Nanoparticles as Efficient Antimicrobial Agents for Escherichia Coli and Salmonella Typhi

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Gold Nanoparticles as Efficient Antimicrobial Agents for Escherichia Coli and Salmonella Typhi

Enrique Lima et al. Chem Cent J.

Abstract

Background: It is imperative to eliminate bacteria present in water in order to avoid problems in healthy. Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi bacteria are two common pollutants and they are developing resistance to some of the most used bactericide. Therefore new biocide materials are being tested. Thus, gold nanoparticles are proposed to inhibit the growth of these two microorganisms.

Results: Gold nanoparticles were supported onto clinoptilolite, mordenite and faujasite zeolites. Content of gold in materials varied between 2.3 and 2.8 wt%. The size, dispersion and roughness of gold nanoparticles were highly dependent of the zeolite support. The faujasite support was the support where the 5 nm nanoparticles were highly dispersed. The efficiency of gold-zeolites as bactericides of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi was determined by the zeolite support.

Conclusions: Gold nanoparticles dispersed on zeolites eliminate Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi at short times. The biocidal properties of gold nanoparticles are influenced by the type of support which, indeed, drives key parameters as the size and roughness of nanoparticles. The more actives materials were pointed out Au-faujasite. These materials contained particles sized 5 nm at surface and eliminate 90-95% of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi colonies.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
X-ray diffraction patterns of Au-zeolites (a) Au-Y (b) Au-M and (c) Au-C.
Figure 2
Figure 2
On the left, 29Si MAS NMR spectra and on the right the 27Al MAS NMR spectra acquired at 79.46 and 104 MHz, respectively.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Diameter distribution of Au particles in Au-zeolite samples, as determined by TEM analysis.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Colonies formed by cell of Escherichia coli surviving after culture media was exposed to H-zeolites and Au-zeolites.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Evolution as time went on of number of Escherichia coli colonies formed by cells survived in culture media in the presence of H-C (−o-), Au-C (−●-), H-M (−∆–), Au-M (−▲–), H-Y (−◊-) and Au-Y(−♦-).
Figure 6
Figure 6
Evolution as time went on of number of Salmonella typhi colonies formed by cells survived in culture media in the presence of H-C (−o-), Au-C (−●-), H-M (−∆–), Au-M (−▲–), H-Y (−◊-) and Au-Y (−♦-).

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