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, 10 (1), 417-42

Understanding Urban Green Space as a Health Resource: A Qualitative Comparison of Visit Motivation and Derived Effects Among Park Users in Sheffield, UK

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Understanding Urban Green Space as a Health Resource: A Qualitative Comparison of Visit Motivation and Derived Effects Among Park Users in Sheffield, UK

Katherine N Irvine et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health.

Abstract

With increasing interest in the use of urban green space to promote human health, there is a need to understand the extent to which park users conceptualize these places as a resource for health and well-being. This study sought to examine park users' own reasons for and benefits from green space usage and compare these with concepts and constructs in existing person-environment-health theories and models of health. Conducted in 13 public green spaces in Sheffield, UK, we undertook a qualitative content analysis of 312 park users' responses to open-ended interview questions and identified a breadth, depth and salience of visit motivators and derived effects. Findings highlight a discrepancy between reasons for visiting and derived effects from the use of urban green space. Motivations emphasized walking, green space qualities, and children. Derived effects highlighted relaxation, positive emotions within the self and towards the place, and spiritual well-being. We generate a taxonomy of motivations and derived effects that could facilitate operationalization within empirical research and articulate a conceptual framework linking motivators to outcomes for investigating green space as a resource for human health and well-being.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Relative endorsement of visit motivation for and derived effects from the use of urban green space. Domains associated with visit motivation (left) and derived effects (right) are depicted along with the number and percent of comments associated with each domain.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Measurement Model for Person-Environment-Health Relationship. The model distinguishes between the motivations for use of and the potential derived effects from interaction with the natural environment, providing a framework for measurement of health/well-being.

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