From bone abnormalities to mineral metabolism dysregulation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

Pediatr Nephrol. 2013 Nov;28(11):2089-96. doi: 10.1007/s00467-012-2384-5. Epub 2013 Jan 24.

Abstract

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common monogenic cause of kidney failure. It is a systemic disorder, not only affecting the kidneys, but also associated with cyst formation in other organs such as the liver, spleen, pancreas, and seminal vesicles. Other extra-renal symptoms may consist of intracranial arterial aneurysms, cardiac valvular defects, abdominal and inguinal hernias and colonic diverticulosis. Very little is known regarding bone involvement in ADPKD; however, recent evidence has revealed the potential role of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). FGF23 is an endocrine fibroblast growth factor acting in the kidney as a phosphaturic hormone and a suppressor of active vitamin D with key effects on the bone/kidney/parathyroid axis, and has been shown to increase in patients with ADPKD, even with normal renal function. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of bone and mineral abnormalities found in experimental models and in patients with ADPKD, and to discuss the possible role of FGF23 in this disease.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Bone and Bones / pathology*
  • Child
  • Cilia / pathology
  • Fibroblast Growth Factors / metabolism
  • Glucuronidase / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Minerals / metabolism*
  • Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant / metabolism*
  • Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant / pathology*

Substances

  • Minerals
  • Fibroblast Growth Factors
  • fibroblast growth factor 23
  • Glucuronidase
  • klotho protein