"Catheter-pens"--an alternative to insulin pump treatment?

Exp Clin Endocrinol. 1990 Feb;95(1):157-69. doi: 10.1055/s-0029-1210948.

Abstract

Two types of insulin pens MADI and MD, were connected to subcutaneous catheters. These "catheter-pens" were used like hand-driven insulin pumps. Results after 1 year of treatment in 30 type 1 diabetics (HCP-negative; age at onset of diabetes 16.5 +/- 1.7 years; duration of diabetes 18.5 +/- 1.6 years, on multiple insulin injections before catheter-pen application): 1. better quality of life (reduction of frequency of needle pricks, more flexibility, inconspicuous application of insulin in public); 2. daily insulin--increased number of "injections" (4.2 +/- 0.1 vs 5.8 +/- 0.1, p less than 0.01), reduction of units per kg BW (0.70 +/- 0.02 vs 0.60 +/- 0.01, p less than 0.01), reduction of intermediate-acting insulin (14.1 +/- 1.3 vs 9.2 +/- 1.2 U/d, p less than 0.05); 3. no change of HbA1 (10.8 +/- 0.8 vs 10.2 +/- 0.2%, normal range 7.7 to 8.4%), mean blood glucose (MBG) in stress situation (8.4 +/- 0.4 vs 7.7 +/- 0.3 mmol/l), serum cholesterol and body weight, both within normal range; 4. improvement (p less than 0.05) of serum triglycerides, serum HDL-cholesterol, ratio of apolipoprotein A1/B; 5. rare skin reactions at the needle site. Conclusion. Catheter-pens offer a very convenient alternative for insulin administration in intensified conventional insulin treatment with multiple injections in type 1 diabetics.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Apolipoproteins A / blood
  • Catheters, Indwelling
  • Cholesterol, HDL / blood
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / metabolism
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / therapy*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Insulin Infusion Systems*
  • Male
  • Triglycerides / blood

Substances

  • Apolipoproteins A
  • Cholesterol, HDL
  • Triglycerides