SBIRT for adolescent drug and alcohol use: current status and future directions

J Subst Abuse Treat. May-Jun 2013;44(5):463-72. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2012.11.005. Epub 2013 Jan 24.

Abstract

Adolescence is a period of rapid biological, psychological, and social development in the human life cycle. Drug and alcohol misuse during this critical period poses substantial problems for individual and public health, yet is highly prevalent in the United States and elsewhere. The screening, brief interventions, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) model may be well-suited for identifying and intervening with adolescents who are at-risk of developing substance use disorders and those adolescents whose substance use puts them at risk for injury or illness. This article reviews the literature on SBIRT for adolescent populations, focusing on findings from randomized controlled trials. The limited evidence suggests that brief interventions may be effective with adolescents, but a number of gaps in the literature were identified. Considerations for implementing SBIRT with adolescent populations are discussed. Randomized trials are needed that have adequate statistical power, employ longer-term follow-ups, and test the effectiveness of SBIRT for adolescents in various service delivery settings.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Alcohol Drinking / epidemiology
  • Alcohol Drinking / prevention & control*
  • Alcohol-Related Disorders / epidemiology
  • Alcohol-Related Disorders / rehabilitation*
  • Humans
  • Mass Screening / methods
  • Psychotherapy, Brief / methods
  • Public Health
  • Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic / methods
  • Risk
  • Substance-Related Disorders / epidemiology
  • Substance-Related Disorders / rehabilitation*
  • United States / epidemiology