Surgical and nonsurgical treatment of peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in dogs and cats: 58 cases (1999-2008)

J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2013 Mar 1;242(5):643-50. doi: 10.2460/javma.242.5.643.

Abstract

Objective: To determine clinical findings and outcomes for cats and dogs with peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH) treated surgically or nonsurgically.

Design: Retrospective case series.

Animals: 28 dogs and 30 cats.

Procedures: Medical records for cats and dogs evaluated at 1 of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals were reviewed, and data regarding clinical signs, diagnostic and surgical findings, and outcome were evaluated.

Results: Prevalence of PPDH in the 2 hospitals during the study period was 0.025% (0.062% and 0.015% for cats and dogs, respectively); PPDH was an incidental finding for 13 (46.4%) dogs and 15 (50.0%) cats. Other congenital abnormalities were identified in 16 (571%) dogs and 7 (23.3%) cats (most commonly umbilical hernias, abdominal wall hernias cranial to the umbilicus, or sternal anomalies). Thirty-four (58.6%) animals underwent surgical repair of PPDH; 27 (79.4%) of these animals had a primary diagnosis of PPDH. Detection of clinical signs of PPDH (primary diagnosis) and intestines in the pericardial sac were significantly associated with surgical treatment. Short-term mortality rate for surgically treated animals was 8.8% (3/34). Clinical signs associated with PPDH resolved in 29 (85.3%) of surgically treated animals. No significant differences were detected between dogs and cats or between surgically and nonsurgically treated animals regarding long-term survival rate.

Conclusions and clinical relevance: Results of this study indicated animals with clinical signs of PPDH were more likely to undergo surgery than were animals without such signs. Herniorrhaphy was typically effective for resolution of clinical signs. Long-term survival rates were similar regardless of treatment method. Surgical or nonsurgical treatment of PPDH may be appropriate for animals with or without clinical signs, respectively.

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Cat Diseases / pathology
  • Cat Diseases / therapy*
  • Cats
  • Dog Diseases / pathology
  • Dog Diseases / therapy*
  • Dogs
  • Female
  • Hernia, Diaphragmatic / pathology
  • Hernia, Diaphragmatic / therapy
  • Hernia, Diaphragmatic / veterinary*
  • Male
  • Retrospective Studies