"How high do they look?": identification and treatment of common ingestions in adolescents

J Pediatr Health Care. 2013 Mar-Apr;27(2):135-44. doi: 10.1016/j.pedhc.2012.12.002.

Abstract

Adolescents have access to a variety of legal or illicit substances that they use to alter their mood or "get high." The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of common substances adolescents use to get high, including the illicit substances synthetic marijuana or "Spice," salvia, MDMA, synthetic cathinones, and 2C-E. Dextromethorphan and energy drinks are easily accessible substances that teenagers abuse. The toxic effects of common ingestions and treatment of overdose is discussed to inform pediatric providers who provide care for adolescents.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adolescent Behavior* / psychology
  • Benzodioxoles / adverse effects
  • Benzodioxoles / toxicity*
  • Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists / adverse effects
  • Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists / toxicity*
  • Cannabinoids / adverse effects
  • Cannabinoids / toxicity*
  • Charcoal / therapeutic use
  • Dextromethorphan / adverse effects
  • Dextromethorphan / toxicity*
  • Drug Overdose
  • Emergency Medicine / methods
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Illicit Drugs
  • Male
  • N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine / adverse effects
  • N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine / toxicity*
  • Naloxone / therapeutic use
  • North Carolina / epidemiology
  • Ondansetron / therapeutic use
  • Prevalence
  • Pyrrolidines / adverse effects
  • Pyrrolidines / toxicity*
  • Substance-Related Disorders / epidemiology
  • Substance-Related Disorders / prevention & control*

Substances

  • Benzodioxoles
  • Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists
  • Cannabinoids
  • Illicit Drugs
  • Pyrrolidines
  • Charcoal
  • Naloxone
  • Ondansetron
  • Dextromethorphan
  • 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone
  • N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine