Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Meta-Analysis
. 2013;8(2):e56803.
doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0056803. Epub 2013 Feb 20.

Effect of Antioxidant Vitamin Supplementation on Cardiovascular Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Affiliations
Free PMC article
Meta-Analysis

Effect of Antioxidant Vitamin Supplementation on Cardiovascular Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Yizhou Ye et al. PLoS One. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Antioxidant vitamin (vitamin E, beta-carotene, and vitamin C) are widely used for preventing major cardiovascular outcomes. However, the effect of antioxidant vitamin on cardiovascular events remains unclear.

Methodology and principal findings: We searched PubMed, EmBase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the proceedings of major conferences for relevant literature. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials that reported on the effects of antioxidant vitamin on cardiovascular outcomes as compared to placebo. Outcomes analyzed were major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac death, total death, and any possible adverse events. We used the I(2) statistic to measure heterogeneity between trials and calculated risk estimates for cardiovascular outcomes with random-effect meta-analysis. Independent extraction was performed by two reviewers and consensus was reached. Of 293 identified studies, we included 15 trials reporting data on 188209 participants. These studies reported 12749 major cardiovascular events, 6699 myocardial infarction, 3749 strokes, 14122 total death, and 5980 cardiac deaths. Overall, antioxidant vitamin supplementation as compared to placebo had no effect on major cardiovascular events (RR, 1.00; 95%CI, 0.96-1.03), myocardial infarction (RR, 0.98; 95%CI, 0.92-1.04), stroke (RR, 0.99; 95%CI, 0.93-1.05), total death (RR, 1.03; 95%CI, 0.98-1.07), cardiac death (RR, 1.02; 95%CI, 0.97-1.07), revascularization (RR, 1.00; 95%CI, 0.95-1.05), total CHD (RR, 0.96; 95%CI, 0.87-1.05), angina (RR, 0.98; 95%CI, 0.90-1.07), and congestive heart failure (RR, 1.07; 95%CI, 0.96 to 1.19).

Conclusion/significance: Antioxidant vitamin supplementation has no effect on the incidence of major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, stroke, total death, and cardiac death.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1. Flow diagram of the literature search and trial selection process.
Figure 2
Figure 2. Effects of antioxidant vitamin supplementation on the risk of major cardiovascular events.
Figure 3
Figure 3. Effects of antioxidant vitamin supplementation on the risk of myocardial infarction.
Figure 4
Figure 4. Effects of antioxidant vitamin supplementation on the risk of stroke.
Figure 5
Figure 5. Effects of antioxidant vitamin supplementation on the risk of total death.
Figure 6
Figure 6. Effects of antioxidant vitamin supplementation on the risk of cardiac death.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 54 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Yusuf S, Reddy S, Ounpuu S, Anand S (2001) Global burden of cardiovascular diseases, I: general considerations, the epidemiologic transition, risk factors, and impact of urbanization. Circulation 104: 2746–2753. - PubMed
    1. Williams GR, Jiang JG, Matchar DB, Samsa GP (1999) Incidence and occurrence of total (first-ever and recurrent) stroke. Stroke 30: 2523–8. - PubMed
    1. Ames BN (1983) Dietary carcinogens and anticarcinogens. Science 221: 1256–1264. - PubMed
    1. Frei B (1994) Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant vitamins: mechanisms of action. Am J Med 97: 5S–13S. - PubMed
    1. Diplock AT (1991) Antioxidant nutrients and disease prevention: an overview. Am J Clin Nutr 53: 189S–193S. - PubMed

Publication types

Grant support

The authors have no support or funding to report.
Feedback