Metabolic factors associated with risk of renal cell carcinoma

PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e57475. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0057475. Epub 2013 Feb 28.

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that obesity and hypertension are associated with increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but less is known about the association to other metabolic factors. In the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can) data on body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), blood pressure, and circulating levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were collected from 560,388 men and women in cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden. By use of Cox proportional hazard models, hazard ratios (HR) were calculated for separate and composite metabolic exposures. During a median follow-up of 10 years, 592 men and 263 women were diagnosed with RCC. Among men, we found an increased risk of RCC for BMI, highest vs. lowest quintile, (HR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.13-2.03), systolic blood pressure, (HR = 3.40, 95% CI 1.91-6.06), diastolic blood pressure, (HR = 3.33, 95% CI 1.85-5.99), glucose, (HR = 3.75, 95% CI 1.46-9.68), triglycerides, (HR = 1.79, 95% CI 1.00-3.21) and a composite score of these metabolic factors, (HR = 2.68, 95% CI 1.75-4.11). Among women we found an increased risk of RCC for BMI, highest vs. lowest quintile, (HR = 2.21, 95% CI 1.32-3.70) and the composite score, (HR = 2.29, 95% CI 1.12-4.68). High levels of the composite score were also associated with risk of death from RCC among both men and women. No multiplicative statistical or biological interactions between metabolic factors on risk of RCC were found. High levels of BMI, blood pressure, glucose and triglycerides among men and high BMI among women were associated with increased risk of RCC.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Carcinoma, Renal Cell / metabolism*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Kidney Neoplasms / metabolism*
  • Male
  • Proportional Hazards Models
  • Risk Factors

Grant support

This study was supported by grants from Lion’s Cancer Research Foundation (http://www.cancerforskningsfond-umea.lions.se/), Umeå University, Sweden (LP 09-1799). Funding for the Me-Can project was obtained from the World Cancer Research Fund (http://www.wcrf.org/) (2007/09 and 2010/247) and the Swedish Cancer Foundation (http://www.cancerfonden.se/sv/Information-in-English/)(2010/628). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.