Childhood parasitic infections endemic to the United States

Pediatr Clin North Am. 2013 Apr;60(2):471-85. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2012.12.011. Epub 2013 Jan 18.

Abstract

Endemic parasitic infections in the United States are more frequent than is commonly perceived. Intestinal parasitic infection with Cryptosporidium, Dientamoeba, and Giardia occurs most often in children in northern states during the summer months. Zoonotic Toxocara and Toxoplasma parasitic infections are more frequent in southern states, in African Americans, and in populations with lower socioeconomic status. Approximately 300, 000 people in the United States have Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Local, vector-borne transmission of T cruzi and Leishmania infections has been documented in southern states. Parasitic diseases endemic to the United States are not uncommon but are understudied.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • African Americans / statistics & numerical data
  • Albendazole / therapeutic use
  • Antiparasitic Agents / administration & dosage
  • Antiparasitic Agents / therapeutic use*
  • Chagas Disease / diagnosis
  • Chagas Disease / epidemiology
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Cryptosporidiosis / diagnosis
  • Cryptosporidiosis / epidemiology
  • Dientamoebiasis / diagnosis
  • Dientamoebiasis / epidemiology
  • Endemic Diseases*
  • Giardiasis / diagnosis
  • Giardiasis / epidemiology
  • Humans
  • Leishmaniasis / diagnosis
  • Leishmaniasis / epidemiology
  • Mebendazole / therapeutic use
  • Parasitic Diseases / diagnosis*
  • Parasitic Diseases / drug therapy
  • Parasitic Diseases / epidemiology*
  • Parasitic Diseases / parasitology
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • Toxocariasis / diagnosis
  • Toxocariasis / epidemiology
  • Toxoplasmosis / diagnosis
  • Toxoplasmosis / epidemiology
  • Trypanosoma cruzi / isolation & purification
  • United States / epidemiology

Substances

  • Antiparasitic Agents
  • Mebendazole
  • Albendazole