Transcriptional suppression, DNA methylation, and histone deacetylation of the regulator of G-protein signaling 10 (RGS10) gene in ovarian cancer cells

PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e60185. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0060185. Epub 2013 Mar 22.

Abstract

RGS10 regulates ovarian cancer cell growth and survival, and RGS10 expression is suppressed in cell models of ovarian cancer chemoresistance. However, the mechanisms governing RGS10 expression in ovarian cancer are poorly understood. Here we report RGS10 suppression in primary ovarian cancer and CAOV-3 ovarian cancer cells compared to immortalized ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE) cells, and in A2780-AD chemoresistant cells compared to parental A2780 cells. RGS10-1 and RGS10-2 transcripts are expressed in ovarian cancer cells, but only RGS10-1 is suppressed in A2780-AD and CAOV-3 cells, and the RGS10-1 promoter is uniquely enriched in CpG dinucleotides. Pharmacological inhibition of DNA methyl-transferases (DNMTs) increased RGS10 expression, suggesting potential regulation by DNA methylation. Bisulfite sequencing analysis identified a region of the RGS10-1 promoter with significantly enhanced DNA methylation in chemoresistant A2780-AD cells relative to parental A2780 cells. DNA methylation in CAOV-3 and IOSE cells was similar to A2780 cells. More marked differences were observed in histone acetylation of the RGS10-1 promoter. Acetylated histone H3 associated with the RGS10-1 promoter was significantly lower in A2780-AD cells compared to parental cells, with a corresponding increase in histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzyme association. Similarly, acetylated histone levels at the RGS10-1 promoter were markedly lower in CAOV-3 cells compared to IOSE cells, and HDAC1 binding was doubled in CAOV-3 cells. Finally, we show that pharmacological inhibition of DNMT or HDAC enzymes in chemoresistant A2780-AD cells increases RGS10 expression and enhances cisplatin toxicity. These data suggest that histone de-acetylation and DNA methylation correlate with RGS10 suppression and chemoresistance in ovarian cancer. Markers for loss of RGS10 expression may identify cancer cells with unique response to therapeutics.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Acetylation
  • Cell Line, Tumor
  • DNA Methylation / genetics*
  • Female
  • Histones / metabolism*
  • Humans
  • Ovarian Neoplasms / genetics*
  • Ovarian Neoplasms / metabolism*
  • RGS Proteins / genetics*

Substances

  • Histones
  • RGS Proteins
  • RGS10 protein, human