Diagnostic cancer genome sequencing and the contribution of germline variants

Science. 2013 Mar 29;339(6127):1559-62. doi: 10.1126/science.1233899.

Abstract

Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is revolutionizing medical research and has the potential to serve as a powerful and cost-effective diagnostic tool in the management of cancer. We review the progress to date in the use of WGS to reveal how germline variants and mutations may be associated with cancer. We use colorectal cancer as an example of how the current level of knowledge can be translated into predictions of predisposition. We also address challenges in the clinical implementation of the variants in germline DNA identified through cancer genome sequencing. We call for the international development of standards to facilitate the clinical use of germline information arising from diagnostic cancer genome sequencing.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins
  • Cell Cycle Proteins / genetics
  • DNA Mutational Analysis / methods*
  • DNA Polymerase II / genetics
  • DNA Polymerase III / genetics
  • DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics
  • Genetic Predisposition to Disease / genetics
  • Genome, Human*
  • Germ-Line Mutation*
  • Humans
  • Neoplasms / diagnosis*
  • Neoplasms / genetics*
  • Penetrance
  • Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins
  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / genetics
  • Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics
  • Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics

Substances

  • Cell Cycle Proteins
  • DNA-Binding Proteins
  • Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins
  • Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
  • Tumor Suppressor Proteins
  • ATM protein, human
  • Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins
  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
  • POLD1 protein, human
  • DNA Polymerase II
  • DNA Polymerase III
  • POLE protein, human