Factors in sustained recovery from cocaine dependence

J Subst Abuse Treat. 2013 Aug;45(2):163-72. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2013.02.007. Epub 2013 Apr 2.

Abstract

The goal was to identify factors that predicted sustained cocaine abstinence and transitions from cocaine use to abstinence over 24 months. Data from baseline assessments and multiple follow-ups were obtained from three studies of continuing care for patients in intensive outpatient programs (IOPs). In the combined sample, remaining cocaine abstinent and transitioning into abstinence at the next follow-up were predicted by older age, less education, and less cocaine and alcohol use at baseline, and by higher self-efficacy, commitment to abstinence, better social support, lower depression, and lower scores on other problem severity measures assessed during the follow-up. In addition, higher self-help participation, self-help beliefs, readiness to change, and coping assessed during the follow-up predicted transitions from cocaine use to abstinence. These results were stable over 24 months. Commitment to abstinence, self-help behaviors and beliefs, and self-efficacy contributed independently to the prediction of cocaine use transitions. Implications for treatment are discussed.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Adaptation, Psychological*
  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Alcohol Drinking / epidemiology
  • Ambulatory Care / methods*
  • Cocaine-Related Disorders / psychology
  • Cocaine-Related Disorders / rehabilitation*
  • Educational Status
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Patient Acceptance of Health Care*
  • Self Efficacy
  • Self-Help Groups / statistics & numerical data
  • Time Factors
  • Treatment Outcome