Long-term Pulmonary Outcomes of Patients With Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

Semin Perinatol. 2013 Apr;37(2):132-7. doi: 10.1053/j.semperi.2013.01.010.

Abstract

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the commonest cause of chronic lung disease in infancy. The incidence of BPD has remained unchanged despite many advances in neonatal care. BPD starts in the neonatal period but its effects can persist long term. Premature infants with BPD have a greater incidence of hospitalization, and continue to have a greater respiratory morbidity and need for respiratory medications, compared to those without BPD. Lung function abnormalites, especially small airway abnormalities, often persist. Even in the absence of clinical symptoms, BPD survivors have persistent radiological abnormalities and presence of emphysema has been reported on chest computed tomography scans. Concern regarding their exercise tolerance remains. Long-term effects of BPD are still unknown, but given reports of a more rapid decline in lung function and their suspectibility to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotype with aging, it is imperative that lung function of survivors of BPD be closely monitored.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia / complications
  • Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia / diagnostic imaging
  • Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia / physiopathology*
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Disease Progression
  • Exercise Tolerance
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant, Premature
  • Lung / diagnostic imaging
  • Lung / physiopathology*
  • Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive / etiology
  • Pulmonary Emphysema / etiology
  • Radiography