Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Review
. 2013 Jun;27(2):336-50.
doi: 10.1037/a0032435. Epub 2013 Apr 15.

The Contributions of Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging to Understanding Mechanisms of Behavior Change in Addiction

Affiliations
Free PMC article
Review

The Contributions of Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging to Understanding Mechanisms of Behavior Change in Addiction

Jon Morgenstern et al. Psychol Addict Behav. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

In the last decade, there has been an upsurge of interest in understanding the mechanisms of behavior change (MOBC) and effective behavioral interventions as a strategy to improve addiction-treatment efficacy. However, there remains considerable uncertainty about how treatment research should proceed to address the MOBC issue. In this article, we argue that limitations in the underlying models of addiction that inform behavioral treatment pose an obstacle to elucidating MOBC. We consider how advances in the cognitive neuroscience of addiction offer an alternative conceptual and methodological approach to studying the psychological processes that characterize addiction, and how such advances could inform treatment process research. In addition, we review neuroimaging studies that have tested aspects of neurocognitive theories as a strategy to inform addiction therapies and discuss future directions for transdisciplinary collaborations across cognitive neuroscience and MOBC research.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Hierarchical components of framework that undergirds current behavioral intervention research.
Figure 2
Figure 2
A schematic diagram illustrating key structures belonging to the impulsive system (red) and the reflective system (blue). An emergent dominant pattern of affective signaling can modulate activity of several components of the impulsive and reflective systems. These include regions involved in (a) representing patterns of affective states (e.g., the insula and somatosensory cortices); (b) triggering of affective states, e.g., amygdala (A) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC); (c) memory, impulse, and attention control (e.g., lateral orbitofrontal, inferior frontal gyrus, and dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPC), hippocampus (Hip) and anterior cingulate (AC); and (d) behavioral actions (e.g., striatum and supplementary motor area). 5-HT = serotonin; DA = dopamine. Reprinted by permission Macmillan Publishers Ltd. from “Decision making, impulse control and loss of willpower to resist drugs: a neurocognitive perspective,” by Antoine Bechara, 2005, Nature Neuroscience, 8, p. 1459. Copyright 2005 by Nature Publishing Group.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 29 articles

See all "Cited by" articles
Feedback