Consumption of low-fat dairy foods for 6 months improves insulin resistance without adversely affecting lipids or bodyweight in healthy adults: a randomized free-living cross-over study

Nutr J. 2013 May 2;12:56. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-12-56.

Abstract

Background: Given the highly debated role of dairy food consumption in modulating biomarkers of metabolic syndrome, this study was conducted to examine the influence of long-term (6 month) dairy consumption on metabolic parameters in healthy volunteers under free-living conditions without energy restriction.

Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects completed a randomized, crossover trial of 12 months. Participants consumed their habitual diets and were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: a high dairy supplemented group instructed to consume 4 servings of dairy per day (HD); or a low dairy supplemented group limited to no more than 2 servings of dairy per day (LD). Baseline, midpoint, and endpoint metabolic responses were examined.

Results: Endpoint measurements of body weight and composition, energy expenditure, blood pressure, blood glucose, and blood lipid and lipoprotein responses did not differ (p > 0.05) between the LD and HD groups. HD consumption improved (p < 0.05) plasma insulin (-9%) and insulin resistance (-11%, p = 0.03) as estimated by HOMA-IR compared with the LD group.

Conclusions: Study results suggest that high dairy consumption (4 servings/d) may improve insulin resistance without negatively impacting bodyweight or lipid status under free-living conditions.

Trial registration: Clinical Trials.gov: NCT01761955.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Blood Glucose / analysis
  • Blood Pressure
  • Body Composition
  • Body Mass Index
  • Body Weight*
  • Cross-Over Studies
  • Dairy Products / analysis*
  • Diet
  • Endpoint Determination
  • Energy Metabolism
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Insulin / blood
  • Insulin Resistance*
  • Lipids / blood*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Young Adult

Substances

  • Blood Glucose
  • Insulin
  • Lipids

Associated data

  • ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT01761955