Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2013 May 16;13:113.
doi: 10.1186/1471-2393-13-113.

Habitual Snoring and Depressive Symptoms During Pregnancy

Free PMC article

Habitual Snoring and Depressive Symptoms During Pregnancy

Louise M O'Brien et al. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Depression is frequently observed in patients with untreated sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in the general population. Pregnant women are particularly vulnerable since pregnancy increases the risk of both SDB and depressive symptoms. However, no study has investigated whether SDB symptoms prior to or in early pregnancy are associated with such mood problems.

Methods: A retrospective chart review of pregnant women. Women were included if they attended prenatal clinics between June 2007 and July 2010, were ≥18 years old, pregnant with a single fetus, and had been screened for habitual snoring as well as depressive symptoms using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scales (EPDS).

Results: In total, 362 women were included and 32.3% reported habitual snoring. Twenty-nine percent of women had an EPDS score ≥10. Significantly more snoring women, compared to non-snorers, had an EPDS score ≥10 (42.7% vs. 22.9%, p < 0.001) despite the mean EPDS values not reaching statistical significance (6.1 ± 4.9 vs. 5.4 ± 5.0, p = 0.2). In a logistic regression model controlling for parity, the presence of pre-pregnancy obesity, presence of a partner, sleep quality, African American race, maternal educational level, pre-eclampsia, and diabetes, snoring was independently associated with a prenatal EPDS score ≥10 (O.R. 2.0, 95%CI 1.13-3.46; p = 0.023).

Conclusion: Maternal snoring may be a risk factor for prenatal depressive symptoms. Further investigation of the temporal relationship between maternal snoring and depressive symptoms is warranted.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 7 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Bennett HA. Prevalence of depression during pregnancy: systematic review. Obstet Gynecol (New York. 1953) 2004;103(4):698–709. - PubMed
    1. Gavin NI, Gaynes BN, Lohr KN, Meltzer-Brody S, Gartlehner G, Swinson T. Perinatal depression: a systematic review of prevalence and incidence. Obstet Gynecol. 2005;106(5 Pt 1):1071–1083. - PubMed
    1. Orr ST, Blazer DG, James SA. Racial disparities in elevated prenatal depressive symptoms among black and white women in Eastern North Carolina. Ann Epidemiol. 2006;16(6):463–468. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2005.08.004. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Grote NK. A meta-analysis of depression during pregnancy and the risk of preterm birth, low birth weight, and intrauterine growth restriction. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2010;67(10):1012–1024. doi: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2010.111. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Moehler E, Brunner R, Wiebel A, Reck C, Resch F. Maternal depressive symptoms in the postnatal period are associated with long-term impairment of mother-child bonding. Arch Womens Ment Health. 2006;9(5):273–278. doi: 10.1007/s00737-006-0149-5. - DOI - PubMed

Publication types

MeSH terms

Feedback