The social and political lives of zoonotic disease models: narratives, science and policy

Soc Sci Med. 2013 Jul;88:10-7. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.03.017. Epub 2013 Mar 26.

Abstract

Zoonotic diseases currently pose both major health threats and complex scientific and policy challenges, to which modelling is increasingly called to respond. In this article we argue that the challenges are best met by combining multiple models and modelling approaches that elucidate the various epidemiological, ecological and social processes at work. These models should not be understood as neutral science informing policy in a linear manner, but as having social and political lives: social, cultural and political norms and values that shape their development and which they carry and project. We develop and illustrate this argument in relation to the cases of H5N1 avian influenza and Ebola, exploring for each the range of modelling approaches deployed and the ways they have been co-constructed with a particular politics of policy. Addressing the complex, uncertain dynamics of zoonotic disease requires such social and political lives to be made explicit in approaches that aim at triangulation rather than integration, and plural and conditional rather than singular forms of policy advice.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Africa / epidemiology
  • Animals
  • Birds
  • Epidemics / prevention & control*
  • Health Policy*
  • Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola / epidemiology
  • Hong Kong / epidemiology
  • Humans
  • Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype
  • Influenza in Birds / epidemiology
  • Influenza, Human / epidemiology
  • Models, Biological*
  • Narration
  • Policy Making
  • Politics*
  • Science
  • Zoonoses / epidemiology*