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. 2013 Nov;123(11):792-800.
doi: 10.3109/00207454.2013.803104. Epub 2013 Jun 3.

Association of Fish Consumption and Ω 3 Supplementation With Quality of Life, Disability and Disease Activity in an International Cohort of People With Multiple Sclerosis

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Association of Fish Consumption and Ω 3 Supplementation With Quality of Life, Disability and Disease Activity in an International Cohort of People With Multiple Sclerosis

George A Jelinek et al. Int J Neurosci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The role of fish consumption and omega 3 supplementation in multiple sclerosis (MS) is controversial, although there is some evidence to support a beneficial effect. We surveyed a large cohort of people with MS recruited via Web 2.0 platforms, requesting information on type of MS, relapse rates, disability, health-related quality of life, frequency of fish consumption and omega 3 supplementation, including type and dose, using validated tools where possible. We aimed to determine whether there was an association between fish consumption and omega 3 supplementation and quality of life, disability and disease activity for people with MS. Univariate and multivariate analyses were undertaken. Of 2469 respondents, 1493 (60.5%) had relapsing-remitting MS. Those consuming fish more frequently and those taking omega 3 supplements had significantly better quality of life, in all domains, and less disability. For fish consumption, there was a clear dose-response relationship for these associations. There were also trends towards lower relapse rates and reduced disease activity; flaxseed oil supplementation was associated with over 60% lower relapse rate over the previous 12 months. Further dietary studies and randomised controlled trials of omega 3 supplementation for people with MS are required, preferably using flaxseed oil.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
HR-QOL outcomes of all respondents by frequency of fish consumption. Groupwise comparisons: all p < 0.001. Pairwise group comparisons: ****p < 0.001, ***p = 0.002, **p = 0.003, *p = 0.013.

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