High-resolution temporal response patterns to influenza vaccine reveal a distinct human plasma cell gene signature

Sci Rep. 2013;3:2327. doi: 10.1038/srep02327.

Abstract

To identify sources of inter-subject variation in vaccine responses, we performed high-frequency sampling of human peripheral blood cells post-vaccination, followed by a novel systems biology analysis. Functional principal component analysis was used to examine time varying B cell vaccine responses. In subjects vaccinated within the previous three years, 90% of transcriptome variation was explained by a single subject-specific mathematical pattern. Within individual vaccine response patterns, a common subset of 742 genes was strongly correlated with migrating plasma cells. Of these, 366 genes were associated with human plasmablasts differentiating in vitro. Additionally, subject-specific temporal transcriptome patterns in peripheral blood mononuclear cells identified migration of myeloid/dendritic cell lineage cells one day after vaccination. Upstream analyses of transcriptome changes suggested both shared and subject-specific transcription groups underlying larger patterns. With robust statistical methods, time-varying response characteristics of individual subjects were effectively captured along with a shared plasma cell gene signature.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • B-Lymphocytes / drug effects*
  • B-Lymphocytes / immunology*
  • Blood Proteins / genetics
  • Blood Proteins / immunology
  • Cells, Cultured
  • Gene Expression Regulation / drug effects
  • Gene Expression Regulation / genetics*
  • Gene Expression Regulation / immunology*
  • Humans
  • Influenza Vaccines / administration & dosage*
  • Influenza Vaccines / immunology*
  • Transcriptome / drug effects
  • Transcriptome / immunology*

Substances

  • Blood Proteins
  • Influenza Vaccines