Short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides modulate intestinal microbiota and metabolic parameters of humanized gnotobiotic diet induced obesity mice

PLoS One. 2013 Aug 12;8(8):e71026. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0071026. eCollection 2013.

Abstract

Prebiotic fibres like short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS) are known to selectively modulate the composition of the intestinal microbiota and especially to stimulate Bifidobacteria. In parallel, the involvement of intestinal microbiota in host metabolic regulation has been recently highlighted. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of scFOS on the composition of the faecal microbiota and on metabolic parameters in an animal model of diet-induced obesity harbouring a human-type microbiota. Forty eight axenic C57BL/6J mice were inoculated with a sample of faecal human microbiota and randomly assigned to one of 3 diets for 7 weeks: a control diet, a high fat diet (HF, 60% of energy derived from fat)) or an isocaloric HF diet containing 10% of scFOS (HF-scFOS). Mice fed with the two HF gained at least 21% more weight than mice from the control group. Addition of scFOS partially abolished the deposition of fat mass but significantly increased the weight of the caecum. The analysis of the taxonomic composition of the faecal microbiota by FISH technique revealed that the addition of scFOS induced a significant increase of faecal Bifidobacteria and the Clostridium coccoides group whereas it decreased the Clostridium leptum group. In addition to modifying the composition of the faecal microbiota, scFOS most prominently affected the faecal metabolome (e.g. bile acids derivatives, hydroxyl monoenoic fatty acids) as well as urine, plasma hydrophilic and plasma lipid metabolomes. The increase in C. coccoides and the decrease in C. leptum, were highly correlated to these metabolic changes, including insulinaemia, as well as to the weight of the caecum (empty and full) but not the increase in Bifidobacteria. In conclusion scFOS induce profound metabolic changes by modulating the composition and the activity of the intestinal microbiota, that may partly explain their effect on the reduction of insulinaemia.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Bifidobacterium / classification
  • Cluster Analysis
  • Diet
  • Feces / microbiology
  • Germ-Free Life
  • Glucose Tolerance Test
  • Humans
  • Intestinal Mucosa / metabolism*
  • Intestines / microbiology*
  • Male
  • Metabolome*
  • Metabolomics
  • Mice
  • Mice, Obese
  • Microbiota / drug effects*
  • Obesity / etiology
  • Oligosaccharides / administration & dosage*
  • Oligosaccharides / chemistry

Substances

  • Oligosaccharides

Grant support

The study was supported by the company Beghin-Meiji and by Les Termes de Brides les Bains. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.