Intermediate outcomes of a chronic disease self-management program for Spanish-speaking older adults in South Florida, 2008-2010

Prev Chronic Dis. 2013 Aug 29;10:E146. doi: 10.5888/pcd10.130016.

Abstract

Introduction: The prevalence and negative health effects of chronic diseases are disproportionately high among Hispanics, the largest minority group in the United States. Self-management of chronic conditions by older adults is a public health priority. The objective of this study was to examine 6-week differences in self-efficacy, time spent performing physical activity, and perceived social and role activities limitations for participants in a chronic disease self-management program for Spanish-speaking older adults, Tomando Control de su Salud (TCDS).

Methods: Through the Healthy Aging Regional Collaborative, 8 area agencies delivered 82 workshops in 62 locations throughout South Florida. Spanish-speaking participants who attended workshops from October 1, 2008, through December 31, 2010, were aged 55 years or older, had at least 1 chronic condition, and completed baseline and post-test surveys were included in analysis (N=682). Workshops consisted of six, 2.5-hour sessions offered once per week for 6 weeks. A self-report survey was administered at baseline and again at the end of program instruction. To assess differences in outcomes, a repeated measures general linear model was used, controlling for agency and baseline general health.

Results: All outcomes showed improvement at 6 weeks. Outcomes that improved significantly were self-efficacy to manage disease, perceived social and role activities limitations, time spent walking, and time spent performing other aerobic activities.

Conclusion: Implementation of TCDS significantly improved 4 of 8 health promotion skills and behaviors of Spanish-speaking older adults in South Florida. A community-based implementation of TCDS has the potential to improve health outcomes for a diverse, Spanish-speaking, older adult population.

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Chronic Disease / therapy*
  • Education
  • Female
  • Florida
  • Health Promotion
  • Health Services for the Aged
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Self Care*
  • Self Efficacy
  • Treatment Outcome