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. 2013;3:2620.
doi: 10.1038/srep02620.

Microbiomic Signatures of Psoriasis: Feasibility and Methodology Comparison

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Free PMC article

Microbiomic Signatures of Psoriasis: Feasibility and Methodology Comparison

Alexander Statnikov et al. Sci Rep. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the skin. We sought to use bacterial community abundance data to assess the feasibility of developing multivariate molecular signatures for differentiation of cutaneous psoriatic lesions, clinically unaffected contralateral skin from psoriatic patients, and similar cutaneous loci in matched healthy control subjects. Using 16S rRNA high-throughput DNA sequencing, we assayed the cutaneous microbiome for 51 such matched specimen triplets including subjects of both genders, different age groups, ethnicities and multiple body sites. None of the subjects had recently received relevant treatments or antibiotics. We found that molecular signatures for the diagnosis of psoriasis result in significant accuracy ranging from 0.75 to 0.89 AUC, depending on the classification task. We also found a significant effect of DNA sequencing and downstream analysis protocols on the accuracy of molecular signatures. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to develop accurate molecular signatures for the diagnosis of psoriasis from microbiomic data.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1. Classification accuracy (AUC) versus number of selected features/taxa for 37 feature selection methods averaged over 4 classification tasks (PN vs. CC, PL vs. CC, PL vs. PN, and CC vs. PL and PN) in data based on the V3–V5 16S rRNA locus. Methods from the same algorithmic family are shown with the same markers in the figure.
The pink area contains methods that have nominally higher classification accuracy (AUC) than GLL. The green area contains methods that have selected fewer taxa than GLL. The red dash-dotted line indicates a Pareto frontier constructed over non-GLL methods. Methods on the Pareto frontier are such that no other non-GLL method has both higher AUC and a smaller number of selected features averaged over the four classification tasks.
Figure 2
Figure 2. Classification accuracy (AUC) versus number of selected features/taxa for 37 feature selection methods for each of the four classification tasks (PN vs. CC, PL vs. CC, PL vs. PN, and CC vs. PL and PN) in data based on the V3–V5 16S rRNA gene locus.
Methods from the same algorithmic family are shown with the same markers in the figure. The pink area contains methods that have nominally higher classification accuracy (AUC) than GLL. The green area contains methods that have selected fewer taxa than GLL. The red dash-dotted line indicates a Pareto frontier constructed over non-GLL methods. Methods on the Pareto frontier are such that no other non-GLL method has both higher AUC and a smaller number of selected features for each classification task.

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