Post-treatment lyme syndrome and central sensitization

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. Summer 2013;25(3):176-86. doi: 10.1176/appi.neuropsych.12090223.

Abstract

Central sensitization is a process that links a variety of chronic pain disorders that are characterized by hypersensitivity to noxious stimuli and pain in response to non-noxious stimuli. Among these disorders, treatments that act centrally may have greater efficacy than treatments acting peripherally. Because many individuals with post-treatment Lyme syndrome (PTLS) have a similar symptom cluster, central sensitization may be a process mediating or exacerbating their sensory processing. This article reviews central sensitization, reports new data on sensory hyperarousal in PTLS, explores the potential role of central sensitization in symptom chronicity, and suggests new directions for neurophysiologic and treatment research.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Central Nervous System Sensitization / physiology*
  • Humans
  • Hyperalgesia / diagnosis
  • Hyperalgesia / physiopathology*
  • Lyme Disease / complications*
  • Lyme Disease / drug therapy*
  • Pain Threshold