HIV infection and drugs of abuse: role of acute phase proteins

J Neuroinflammation. 2013 Sep 17;10:113. doi: 10.1186/1742-2094-10-113.

Abstract

Background: HIV infection and drugs of abuse such as methamphetamine (METH), cocaine, and alcohol use have been identified as risk factors for triggering inflammation. Acute phase proteins such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) are the biomarkers of inflammation. Hence, the interactive effect of drugs of abuse with acute phase proteins in HIV-positive subjects was investigated.

Methods: Plasma samples were utilized from 75 subjects with METH use, cocaine use, alcohol use, and HIV-positive alone and HIV-positive METH, cocaine, and alcohol users, and age-matched control subjects. The plasma CRP and SAA levels were measured by ELISA and western blot respectively and the CD4 counts were also measured.

Results: Observed results indicated that the CRP and SAA levels in HIV-positive subjects who are METH, cocaine and alcohol users were significantly higher when compared with either drugs of abuse or HIV-positive alone. The CD4 counts were also dramatically reduced in HIV-positive with drugs of abuse subjects compared with only HIV-positive subjects.

Conclusions: These results suggest that, in HIV-positive subjects, drugs of abuse increase the levels of CRP and SAA, which may impact on the HIV infection and disease progression.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Acute-Phase Proteins / analysis
  • Acute-Phase Proteins / immunology*
  • Blotting, Western
  • Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
  • HIV Infections / blood
  • HIV Infections / complications
  • HIV Infections / immunology*
  • Humans
  • Inflammation / blood
  • Inflammation / immunology
  • Substance-Related Disorders / blood
  • Substance-Related Disorders / complications
  • Substance-Related Disorders / immunology*

Substances

  • Acute-Phase Proteins