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. 2013 Dec;132(12):1427-31.
doi: 10.1007/s00439-013-1375-3. Epub 2013 Oct 8.

No Evidence of Interaction Between Known Lipid-Associated Genetic Variants and Smoking in the Multi-Ethnic PAGE Population

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Free PMC article

No Evidence of Interaction Between Known Lipid-Associated Genetic Variants and Smoking in the Multi-Ethnic PAGE Population

Logan Dumitrescu et al. Hum Genet. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many variants that influence high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and/or triglycerides. However, environmental modifiers, such as smoking, of these known genotype-phenotype associations are just recently emerging in the literature. We have tested for interactions between smoking and 49 GWAS-identified variants in over 41,000 racially/ethnically diverse samples with lipid levels from the Population Architecture Using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study. Despite their biological plausibility, we were unable to detect significant SNP × smoking interactions.

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Fig. 1
Fig. 1
SNP × smoking interaction results by lipid trait and population. Each SNP × smoking interaction was tested for an association with the indicated lipid trait after adjustment for age and sex. p values (−log10 transformed) of the meta-analysis are plotted along the y-axis. SNPs are ordered on the x-axis based on chromosomal location. Each triangle represents a meta-analysis p value for each population. The direction of the arrows corresponds to the direction of the beta coefficient. Populations are color-coded as denoted in the legend: European Americans (EA), African Americans (AA), American Indians (AI), and Mexican Americans/Hispanics (MA). The significance threshold (p = 1.0E−03) is indicated by the red line

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