Modeling seizure self-prediction: an e-diary study

Epilepsia. 2013 Nov;54(11):1960-7. doi: 10.1111/epi.12355. Epub 2013 Sep 20.

Abstract

Purpose: A subset of patients with epilepsy successfully self-predicted seizures in a paper diary study. We conducted an e-diary study to ensure that prediction precedes seizures, and to characterize the prodromal features and time windows that underlie self-prediction.

Methods: Subjects 18 or older with localization-related epilepsy (LRE) and ≥3 seizures per month maintained an e-diary, reporting a.m./p.m. data daily, including mood, premonitory symptoms, and all seizures. Self-prediction was rated by, "How likely are you to experience a seizure (time frame)?" Five choices ranged from almost certain (>95% chance) to very unlikely. Relative odds of seizure (odds ratio, OR) within time frames was examined using Poisson models with log normal random effects to adjust for multiple observations.

Key findings: Nineteen subjects reported 244 eligible seizures. OR for prediction choices within 6 h was as high as 9.31 (CI 1.92-45.23) for "almost certain." Prediction was most robust within 6 h of diary entry, and remained significant up to 12 h. For nine best predictors, average sensitivity was 50%. Older age contributed to successful self-prediction, and self-prediction appeared to be driven by mood and premonitory symptoms. In multivariate modeling of seizure occurrence, self-prediction (2.84; CI 1.68-4.81), favorable change in mood (0.82; CI 0.67-0.99), and number of premonitory symptoms (1.11; CI 1.00-1.24) were significant.

Significance: Some persons with epilepsy can self-predict seizures. In these individuals, the odds of a seizure following a positive prediction are high. Predictions were robust, not attributable to recall bias, and were related to self-awareness of mood and premonitory features. The 6-h prediction window is suitable for the development of preemptive therapy.

Keywords: Electronic diary; Localization-related epilepsy; Premonitory symptoms; Seizure diary; Seizure precipitants; Seizure prediction; Self-prediction.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Affect / physiology*
  • Child
  • Diagnostic Self Evaluation
  • Electroencephalography* / methods
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Odds Ratio
  • Seizures / diagnosis
  • Seizures / physiopathology*
  • Seizures / psychology*
  • Time Factors
  • Young Adult

Grant support