Bacterial community mapping of the mouse gastrointestinal tract

PLoS One. 2013 Oct 7;8(10):e74957. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0074957. eCollection 2013.

Abstract

Keeping mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract communities in balance is crucial for host health maintenance. However, our understanding of microbial communities in the GI tract is still very limited. In this study, samples taken from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities along the mouse GI tract, including those present in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and feces. Further analyses of the 283,234 valid sequences obtained from pyrosequencing revealed that the gastric, duodenal, large intestinal and fecal samples had higher phylogenetic diversity than the jejunum and ileum samples did. The microbial communities found in the small intestine and stomach were different from those seen in the large intestine and fecal samples. A greater proportion of Lactobacillaceae were found in the stomach and small intestine, while a larger proportion of anaerobes such as Bacteroidaceae, Prevotellaceae, Rikenellaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcaceae were found in the large intestine and feces. In addition, inter-mouse variations of microbiota were observed between the large intestinal and fecal samples, which were much smaller than those between the gastric and small intestinal samples. As far as we can ascertain, ours is the first study to systematically characterize bacterial communities from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Feces / microbiology*
  • Gastrointestinal Tract / microbiology*
  • Male
  • Mice
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • RNA, Bacterial / genetics*
  • RNA, Ribosomal, 16S / genetics*

Substances

  • RNA, Bacterial
  • RNA, Ribosomal, 16S

Grant support

This study was supported by the National “Twelfth Five-Year” Plan for Science & Technology of China (2012BAI06B02). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.