Use of antidepressant medication in the United States during pregnancy, 2002-2010

Psychiatr Serv. 2013 Nov 1;64(11):1157-60. doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201200455.

Abstract

Objective: The authors analyzed prescribing for antidepressant medications during 27,328 prenatal visits in ambulatory settings in the United States between 2002 and 2010.

Methods: Data from the 2002-2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were used to compare prescribing for antidepressant medication during visits for outpatient prenatal care between 2002-2006 and 2007-2010.

Results: Prenatal visits associated with a prescription for an antidepressant increased from .7% in 2002-2006 to 2.1% in 2007-2010 (p<.01). The proportion of prescriptions for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) declined (from 87% to 66%, p=.04), particularly for paroxetine (from 19% to <1%, p<.01).

Conclusions: Despite controversy over possible negative effects, prescribing of antidepressants during pregnancy increased between 2002 and 2010. SSRIs represented a smaller proportion of all antidepressants prescribed, and prescribing of paroxetine, likely in response to warnings by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, dropped dramatically.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Ambulatory Care / statistics & numerical data*
  • Ambulatory Care / trends
  • Antidepressive Agents / therapeutic use*
  • Depressive Disorder / drug therapy*
  • Drug Utilization / trends*
  • Female
  • Health Care Surveys
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Practice Guidelines as Topic
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Complications / drug therapy*
  • Prenatal Care / standards
  • Prenatal Care / statistics & numerical data*
  • Prenatal Care / trends
  • Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors / therapeutic use
  • United States / epidemiology
  • Young Adult

Substances

  • Antidepressive Agents
  • Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors