Role of STAT3 in cancer metastasis and translational advances

Biomed Res Int. 2013;2013:421821. doi: 10.1155/2013/421821. Epub 2013 Oct 2.

Abstract

Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a latent cytoplasmic transcription factor, originally discovered as a transducer of signal from cell surface receptors to the nucleus. It is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation at position 705 leading to its dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and activation of gene transcription. Under normal physiological conditions, STAT3 activation is tightly regulated. However, compelling evidence suggests that STAT3 is constitutively activated in many cancers and plays a pivotal role in tumor growth and metastasis. It regulates cellular proliferation, invasion, migration, and angiogenesis that are critical for cancer metastasis. In this paper, we first describe the mechanism of STAT3 regulation followed by how STAT3 is involved in cancer metastasis, then we summarize the various small molecule inhibitors that inhibit STAT3 signaling.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Apoptosis / genetics
  • Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / genetics*
  • Humans
  • Ligands
  • Neoplasm Metastasis / genetics*
  • Neoplasm Metastasis / pathology
  • Neoplasms / genetics*
  • Neoplasms / pathology
  • Protein Biosynthesis
  • STAT3 Transcription Factor / antagonists & inhibitors
  • STAT3 Transcription Factor / biosynthesis
  • STAT3 Transcription Factor / genetics*
  • Signal Transduction
  • Small Molecule Libraries / therapeutic use

Substances

  • Ligands
  • STAT3 Transcription Factor
  • STAT3 protein, human
  • Small Molecule Libraries