Patient engagement in the inpatient setting: a systematic review

J Am Med Inform Assoc. Jul-Aug 2014;21(4):742-50. doi: 10.1136/amiajnl-2013-002141. Epub 2013 Nov 22.

Abstract

Objective: To systematically review existing literature regarding patient engagement technologies used in the inpatient setting.

Methods: PubMed, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Digital Library, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Xplore, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies that discussed patient engagement ('self-efficacy', 'patient empowerment', 'patient activation', or 'patient engagement'), (2) involved health information technology ('technology', 'games', 'electronic health record', 'electronic medical record', or 'personal health record'), and (3) took place in the inpatient setting ('inpatient' or 'hospital'). Only English language studies were reviewed.

Results: 17 articles were identified describing the topic of inpatient patient engagement. A few articles identified design requirements for inpatient engagement technology. The remainder described interventions, which we grouped into five categories: entertainment, generic health information delivery, patient-specific information delivery, advanced communication tools, and personalized decision support.

Conclusions: Examination of the current literature shows there are considerable gaps in knowledge regarding patient engagement in the hospital setting and inconsistent use of terminology regarding patient engagement overall. Research on inpatient engagement technologies has been limited, especially concerning the impact on health outcomes and cost-effectiveness.

Keywords: inpatient; patient engagement; systematic review; technology.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • Review
  • Systematic Review

MeSH terms

  • Communication
  • Electronic Health Records
  • Hospitalization*
  • Humans
  • Inpatients / psychology
  • Internet
  • Medical Informatics / statistics & numerical data*
  • Patient Education as Topic*
  • Patient Participation*
  • Self Efficacy
  • Terminology as Topic
  • Video Games