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. 2013 Oct 24;2013:414363.
doi: 10.1155/2013/414363. eCollection 2013.

Propagation and Introduction of Arnica Montana L. Into Cultivation: A Step to Reduce the Pressure on Endangered and High-Valued Medicinal Plant Species

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Propagation and Introduction of Arnica Montana L. Into Cultivation: A Step to Reduce the Pressure on Endangered and High-Valued Medicinal Plant Species

Danuta Sugier et al. ScientificWorldJournal. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Arnica montana (L.) is an endangered and endemic medicinal plant species in Europe. The pressure on natural sources of this plant is alleviated by a suitable use of arnica resources in the European region and introduction into cultivation. The objective of this study was to describe the impact of different ways of plant propagation and introduction on the growth and reproduction mode of this species. During the six consecutive years of the field experiment, the vegetative and reproductive traits were monitored, and survival time was assessed. The particular ways of arnica plant propagation and introduction determined all the intrinsic species traits and plant survival. The values of the characteristics studied indicated good acclimatization of the arnica ecotype to the climatic conditions of eastern Poland. Practical implications from the data presented here include the possibility of using the presented modes of arnica propagation and introduction in the short- and long-term perspective of arnica cultivation, which can give a possibility of better adjustment of raw material production.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Monthly average temperature and monthly precipitation sum at studied region for six successive study years 2007–2012.
Figure 2
Figure 2
The total number of ramets per genet (TNR) in different ways of A. montana introduction into cultivation. The plants were introduced as clone seedlings (CS) and rosettes (RS) and by sowing (SS). Bars (means) followed by the different letters within the same study year differ significantly (Tukey-test, P < 0.05).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Number of flowering ramets per genet (NFR) in different ways of A. montana introduction into cultivation. Explanation: see Figure 2.
Figure 4
Figure 4
The height (cm) of flowering stems per genet (HS) at different ways of A. montana introduction. The plants were introduced as clone seedlings (CS) and rosettes (RS) and by sowing (SS). Bars (means) followed by the different letters within the same of study year differ significantly (Mann-Whitney U-test, P < 0.05).
Figure 5
Figure 5
The number of heads per genet (NH) in different ways of A. montana introduction. Explanation: see Figure 4.
Figure 6
Figure 6
The number of heads per flowering stem of the genet (NHFS) in different ways of A. montana introduction. Explanation: see Figure 2.
Figure 7
Figure 7
The area of heads (cm−2) per genet (AH) in different ways of A. montana introduction. Explanation: see Figure 4.
Figure 8
Figure 8
The cumulative area of heads (m−2) per genet (CAH) in different ways of A. montana introduction. Explanation: see Figure 4.
Figure 9
Figure 9
The cumulative number of heads per genet (CNH) in different ways of A. montana introduction. Explanation: see Figure 2.
Figure 10
Figure 10
The survival (%) of A. montana individuals in different ways of introduction. Explanation: see Figure 4.

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