Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophage Production

J Vis Exp. 2013 Nov 22;(81):e50966. doi: 10.3791/50966.

Abstract

Macrophages are critical components of the innate and adaptive immune responses, and they are the first line of defense against foreign invaders because of their powerful microbicidal activities. Macrophages are widely distributed throughout the body and are present in the lymphoid organs, liver, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, central nervous system, bone, and skin. Because of their repartition, they participate in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Macrophages are highly versatile cells that are able to recognize microenvironmental alterations and to maintain tissue homeostasis. Numerous pathogens have evolved mechanisms to use macrophages as Trojan horses to survive, replicate in, and infect both humans and animals and to propagate throughout the body. The recent explosion of interest in evolutionary, genetic, and biochemical aspects of host-pathogen interactions has renewed scientific attention regarding macrophages. Here, we describe a procedure to isolate and cultivate macrophages from murine bone marrow that will provide large numbers of macrophages for studying host-pathogen interactions as well as other processes.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Video-Audio Media

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Bone Marrow Cells / cytology*
  • Bone Marrow Cells / drug effects
  • Cell Differentiation / drug effects
  • Cell Differentiation / physiology
  • Cytological Techniques / methods*
  • Fibroblasts / cytology
  • Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor / pharmacology
  • Macrophages / cytology*
  • Macrophages / drug effects
  • Mice

Substances

  • Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor