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. 2014 Jan;46(1):20-6.
doi: 10.1002/lsm.22209. Epub 2013 Dec 11.

Enhanced Clinical Outcome With Manual Massage Following Cryolipolysis Treatment: A 4-month Study of Safety and Efficacy

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Free PMC article

Enhanced Clinical Outcome With Manual Massage Following Cryolipolysis Treatment: A 4-month Study of Safety and Efficacy

Gerald E Boey et al. Lasers Surg Med. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background and objectives: Cryolipolysis procedures have been shown to safely and effectively reduce the thickness of fat in a treated region. This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of post-treatment manual massage would improve efficacy while maintaining the safety profile of the original cryolipolysis treatment protocol.

Materials and methods: The study population consisted of an efficacy group (n = 10) and a safety group (n = 7). Study subjects were treated on each side of the lower abdomen with a Cooling Intensity Factor of 42 (-72.9 mW/cm(2) ) for 60 minutes. One side of the abdomen was massaged post-treatment and the other side served as the control. Immediately post-treatment, the massage side was treated for 1 minute using a vigorous kneading motion followed by 1 minute of circular massage using the pads of the fingers. For the efficacy group, photos and ultrasound measurements were taken at baseline, 2 months, and 4 months post-treatment. For the safety group, histological analysis was completed at 0, 3, 8, 14, 30, 60, and 120 days post-treatment to examine the effects of massage on subcutaneous tissue over time.

Results: Post-treatment manual massage resulted in a consistent and discernible increase in efficacy over the non-massaged side. At 2 months post-treatment, mean fat layer reduction was 68% greater in the massage side than in the non-massage side as measured by ultrasound. By 4 months, mean fat layer reduction was 44% greater in the massage side. Histological results showed no evidence of necrosis or fibrosis resulting from the massage.

Conclusion: Post-treatment manual massage is a safe and effective technique to enhance the clinical outcome from a cryolipolysis procedure.

Keywords: body contouring; cryolipolysis; non-surgical fat reduction; post-treatment massage.

Figures

Fig 1
Fig 1
Cryolipolysis treatments were delivered using a vacuum applicator to the left and right sides of the lower abdomen. One side was manually massaged immediately post-treatment, while the other side was the non-massage control.
Fig 2
Fig 2
Immediately following cryolipolysis treatment, the tissue was vigorously kneaded and pulled away from the body for 1 minute then pushed into the body in a circular massage motion for 1 minute.
Fig 3
Fig 3
Ultrasound images were acquired of the cryolipolysis treated lower abdomen and the untreated control upper abdomen. Ten images were taken of the lower abdomen (five from the massaged side, five from the non-massaged side) and five images were taken from the control area.
Fig 4
Fig 4
Subject #8 had post-treatment massage on left and non-massage control on right. Photographic analysis of post-treatment manual massage at baseline (a), 2-months (b), and 4-months (c) post-treatment.
Fig 5
Fig 5
Subject #10 had post-treatment massage on left and non-massage control on right. Photographic analysis of post-treatment manual massage at baseline (a), 2-months (b), and 4-months (c) post-treatment.
Fig 6
Fig 6
Subject #6 had post-treatment massage on left and non-massage control on right. Photographic analysis of post-treatment manual massage at baseline (a), 2-months (b), and 4-months (c) post-treatment.
Fig 7
Fig 7
Subject #2 had post-treatment massage on left and non-massage control on right. Photographic analysis of post-treatment manual massage at baseline (a), 2-months (b), and 4-months (c) post-treatment.
Fig 8
Fig 8
Fat layer reduction for nine subjects at 2 months. Mean fat layer reduction was 68% greater for the massaged compared to the non-massaged side following cryolipolysis.
Fig 9
Fig 9
Fat layer reduction for eight subjects at 4 months. Mean fat layer reduction was 44% greater for the massaged compared to the non-massaged side following cryolipolysis.
Fig 10
Fig 10
Histology images of abdominal tissue manually massaged post-treatment showed no evidence of necrosis or fibrosis. The massaged and non-massaged tissue looked similar. H&E stain, 40× magnification.

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