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, 10 (1), 8-12
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Prevalence of Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Rotator Cuff Tears in the General Population: From Mass-Screening in One Village

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Prevalence of Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Rotator Cuff Tears in the General Population: From Mass-Screening in One Village

Hiroshi Minagawa et al. J Orthop.

Abstract

Purpose: Rotator cuff tear is the most common shoulder disease in patients with shoulder problems, but its prevalence is not well known.

Methods: We performed a health care check-up of locomotive organs in 664 residents (21.3% of the population) in one village. Ultrasonography on bilateral shoulders was performed in all the participants.

Results: One hundred and forty seven out of 664 subjects (22.1%) had full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The prevalence of tear in each decade was 0% in the 20s to 40s, 10.7% in the 50s, 15.2% in the 60s, 26.5% in the 70s, and 36.6% in the 80s. Symptomatic rotator cuff tears accounted for 34.7% of all tears and asymptomatic tears for 65.3%. The prevalence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears was one-half of all tears in the 50s, whereas it accounted for two-thirds of those over the age of 60. The prevalence of tear was significantly greater in male than in female in the 50s and 60s, but not in the 70s and 80s.

Conclusion: The prevalence of rotator cuff tear in the general population was 22.1%, which increased with age. Asymptomatic tear was twice as common as symptomatic tear.

Keywords: Asymptomatic; Prevalence; Rotator cuff tear; Symptomatic.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Prevalence of rotator cuff tear in each decade. The prevalence of full-thickness rotator cuff tear in each decade was 0% in the 20s to 40s, 10.7% in the 50s, 15.2% in the 60s, 26.5% in the 70s, and 36.6% in the 80s.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Prevalence of rotator cuff tear in male and female subjects. The prevalence in males was significantly greater than in females in their 50s and 60s, but not in the 70s and 80s.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Prevalence of symptomatic and asymptomatic tears. Asymptomatic tear accounted for 50% of all tears in the 50s. However, in the 60s and over, the percentage of asymptomatic tear was significantly greater than that of symptomatic tear.
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Prevalence of tear according to tear size. The small-sized tear was most commonly seen (66.3%) in the 50s. However, the large-sized tear accounted for a substantial fraction of tear in the 60s, 70s and 80s (43.8%, 45.1%, 43.9%, respectively).

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