Amblyopia treatment strategies and new drug therapies

J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. Mar-Apr 2014;51(2):78-86. doi: 10.3928/01913913-20130107-01. Epub 2014 Jan 14.

Abstract

Amblyopia is a unilateral or bilateral reduction of visual acuity secondary to abnormal visual experience during early childhood. It is one of the most common causes of vision loss and monocular blindness and is commonly associated with strabismus, anisometropia, and visual deprivation (in particular congenital cataract and ptosis). It is clinically defined as a two-line difference of best-corrected visual acuity between the eyes. The purpose of this study was to understand the neural mechanisms of amblyopia and summarize the current therapeutic strategies. In particular, the authors focused on the concept of brain plasticity and its implication for new treatment strategies for children and adults with amblyopia.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Amblyopia / etiology
  • Amblyopia / physiopathology
  • Amblyopia / therapy*
  • Bandages
  • Bicuculline / therapeutic use
  • Carbidopa / therapeutic use
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Cytidine Diphosphate Choline / therapeutic use
  • Dopamine Agonists / therapeutic use
  • Drug Combinations
  • GABA-A Receptor Antagonists / therapeutic use
  • Humans
  • Levodopa / therapeutic use
  • Neuronal Plasticity / physiology
  • Nootropic Agents / therapeutic use
  • Ophthalmic Solutions / therapeutic use*
  • Phenethylamines / therapeutic use
  • Refractive Errors / complications
  • Sensory Deprivation
  • Strabismus / complications
  • Strabismus / surgery
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation / methods
  • Visual Cortex / physiopathology

Substances

  • Dopamine Agonists
  • Drug Combinations
  • GABA-A Receptor Antagonists
  • Nootropic Agents
  • Ophthalmic Solutions
  • Phenethylamines
  • carbidopa, levodopa drug combination
  • Levodopa
  • Cytidine Diphosphate Choline
  • Carbidopa
  • Bicuculline