Prophylactic use of a probiotic in the prevention of colic, regurgitation, and functional constipation: a randomized clinical trial

JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Mar;168(3):228-33. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.4367.

Abstract

Importance: Infantile colic, gastroesophageal reflux, and constipation are the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders that lead to referral to a pediatrician during the first 6 months of life and are often responsible for hospitalization, feeding changes, use of drugs, parental anxiety, and loss of parental working days with relevant social consequences.

Objective: To investigate whether oral supplementation with Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 during the first 3 months of life can reduce the onset of colic, gastroesophageal reflux, and constipation in term newborns and thereby reduce the socioeconomic impact of these conditions.

Design: A prospective, multicenter, double-masked, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial was performed on term newborns (age <1 week) born at 9 different neonatal units in Italy between September 1, 2010, and October 30, 2012.

Setting: Parents were asked to record in a structured diary the number of episodes of regurgitation, duration of inconsolable crying (minutes per day), number of evacuations per day, number of visits to pediatricians, feeding changes, hospitalizations, visits to a pediatric emergency department for a perceived health emergency, pharmacologic interventions, and loss of parental working days.

Participants: In total, 589 infants were randomly allocated to receive L reuteri DSM 17938 or placebo daily for 90 days.

Interventions: Prophylactic use of probiotic.

Main outcomes and measures: Reduction of daily crying time, regurgitation, and constipation during the first 3 months of life. Cost-benefit analysis of the probiotic supplementation.

Results: At 3 months of age, the mean duration of crying time (38 vs 71 minutes; P < .01), the mean number of regurgitations per day (2.9 vs 4.6; P < .01), and the mean number of evacuations per day (4.2 vs 3.6; P < .01) for the L reuteri DSM 17938 and placebo groups, respectively, were significantly different. The use of L reuteri DSM 17938 resulted in an estimated mean savings per patient of €88 (US $118.71) for the family and an additional €104 (US $140.30) for the community.

Conclusions and relevance: Prophylactic use of L reuteri DSM 17938 during the first 3 months of life reduced the onset of functional gastrointestinal disorders and reduced private and public costs for the management of this condition.

Trial registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01235884.

Publication types

  • Multicenter Study
  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Chronic Disease
  • Colic / economics
  • Colic / prevention & control*
  • Constipation / economics
  • Constipation / prevention & control*
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Crying
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Female
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux / economics
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux / prevention & control*
  • Humans
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Lactobacillus reuteri*
  • Male
  • Probiotics / economics
  • Probiotics / therapeutic use*
  • Prospective Studies
  • Treatment Outcome

Associated data

  • ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT01235884