Body mass index and risk of death in Asian Americans

Am J Public Health. 2014 Mar;104(3):520-5. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2013.301573. Epub 2014 Jan 16.

Abstract

Objectives: We investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and mortality among Asian Americans.

Methods: We pooled data from prospective cohort studies with 20 672 Asian American adults with no baseline cancer or heart disease history. We estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) with Cox proportional hazards models.

Results: A high, but not low, BMI was associated with increased risk of total mortality among individuals aged 35 to 69 years. The BMI was not related to total mortality among individuals aged 70 years and older. With a BMI 22.5 to < 25 as the reference category among never-smokers aged 35 to 69 years, the hazard ratios for total mortality were 0.83 (95% CI = 0.47, 1.47) for BMI 15 to < 18.5; 0.91 (95% CI = 0.62, 1.32) for BMI 18.5 to < 20; 1.08 (95% CI = 0.86, 1.36) for BMI 20 to < 22.5; 1.14 (95% CI = 0.90, 1.44) for BMI 25 to < 27.5; 1.13 (95% CI = 0.79, 1.62) for BMI 27.5 to < 30; 1.82 (95% CI = 1.25, 2.64) for BMI 30 to < 35; and 2.09 (95% CI = 1.06, 4.11) for BMI 35 to 50. Higher BMI was also related to increased cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality.

Conclusions: High BMI is associated with increased mortality risk among Asian Americans.

Publication types

  • Evaluation Study
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Asian Americans*
  • Body Mass Index*
  • Confidence Intervals
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Mortality*
  • Oceanic Ancestry Group
  • Proportional Hazards Models
  • Prospective Studies
  • Risk Assessment / methods
  • United States