Clinical Policy: Procedural Sedation and Analgesia in the Emergency Department

Ann Emerg Med. 2014 Feb;63(2):247-58.e18. doi: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2013.10.015.

Abstract

This clinical policy from the American College of Emergency Physicians is the revision of a 2005 clinical policy evaluating critical questions related to procedural sedation in the emergency department.1 A writing subcommittee reviewed the literature to derive evidence-based recommendations to help clinicians answer the following critical questions: (1) In patients undergoing procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency department,does preprocedural fasting demonstrate a reduction in the risk of emesis or aspiration? (2) In patients undergoing procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency department, does the routine use of capnography reduce the incidence of adverse respiratory events? (3) In patients undergoing procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency department, what is the minimum number of personnel necessary to manage complications? (4) Inpatients undergoing procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency department, can ketamine, propofol, etomidate, dexmedetomidine, alfentanil and remifentanil be safely administered? A literature search was performed, the evidence was graded, and recommendations were given based on the strength of the available data in the medical literature.

Publication types

  • Practice Guideline
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Alfentanil
  • Analgesia / adverse effects
  • Analgesia / standards*
  • Anesthesia, General / standards
  • Capnography / standards
  • Conscious Sedation / adverse effects
  • Conscious Sedation / standards*
  • Deep Sedation / standards
  • Dexmedetomidine
  • Emergency Service, Hospital / standards*
  • Etomidate
  • Humans
  • Ketamine
  • Piperidines
  • Propofol
  • Remifentanil
  • Workforce

Substances

  • Piperidines
  • Alfentanil
  • Dexmedetomidine
  • Ketamine
  • Remifentanil
  • Propofol
  • Etomidate