Antiepileptic drugs for the primary and secondary prevention of seizures after stroke

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014 Jan 24;(1):CD005398. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005398.pub3.

Abstract

Background: This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in 2010, Issue 1. Seizures after stroke are an important clinical problem, and they may be associated with poor outcome. The effects of antiepileptic drugs for the primary and secondary prevention of seizures after stroke remain unclear.

Objectives: We aimed to assess the effects of antiepileptic drugs for the primary and secondary prevention of seizures after stroke.

Search methods: We searched the Specialised Registers of the Cochrane Epilepsy Group (12 August 2013) and the Cochrane Stroke Group (12 August 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 7), and MEDLINE (OVID, 1946 to 12 August 2013). We also checked the reference lists of articles retrieved from these searches.

Selection criteria: Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in which participants were assigned to treatment or control group (placebo or no drug).

Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently screened all the titles, abstracts, and keywords of publications identified by the searches to assess their eligibility, and both review authors assessed their suitability for inclusion according to prespecified selection criteria. We included only one study for data collection and analysis.

Main results: We found only one trial that fulfilled the study inclusion criteria of comparison of the effects of an antiepileptic drug with placebo (or no drug) for the primary or secondary prevention of seizures after stroke. This was a prospective randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing valproic acid with placebo for primary prevention of seizures in 72 adults (over 18 years of age) with spontaneous non-aneurysmal, non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage; no statistically significant difference in outcome (seizure occurrence at one year) was demonstrated between groups.

Authors' conclusions: Currently, there is insufficient evidence to support the routine use of antiepileptic drugs for the primary or secondary prevention of seizures after stroke. Further well-conducted research is needed for this important clinical problem.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review
  • Systematic Review

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Anticonvulsants / therapeutic use*
  • Humans
  • Primary Prevention / methods
  • Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
  • Secondary Prevention
  • Seizures / etiology
  • Seizures / prevention & control*
  • Stroke / complications*

Substances

  • Anticonvulsants