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. 2014 Jan 20;9(1):e85486.
doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085486. eCollection 2014.

Magnesium Enhances Exercise Performance via Increasing Glucose Availability in the Blood, Muscle, and Brain During Exercise

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Free PMC article

Magnesium Enhances Exercise Performance via Increasing Glucose Availability in the Blood, Muscle, and Brain During Exercise

Hsuan-Ying Chen et al. PLoS One. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Glucose mobilization and utilization in the periphery and central nervous system are important during exercise and are responsible for exercise efficacy. Magnesium (Mg) is involved in energy production and plays a role in exercise performance. This study aimed to explore the effects of Mg on the dynamic changes in glucose and lactate levels in the muscle, blood and brain of exercising rats using a combination of auto-blood sampling and microdialysis. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with saline or magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, 90 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before treadmill exercise (20 m/min for 60 min). Our results indicated that the muscle, blood, and brain glucose levels immediately increased during exercise, and then gradually decreased to near basal levels in the recovery periods of both groups. These glucose levels were significantly enhanced to approximately two-fold (P<0.05) in the Mg group. Lactate levels in the muscle, blood, and brain rapidly and significantly increased in both groups during exercise, and brain lactate levels in the Mg group further elevated (P<0.05) than those in the control group during exercise. Lactate levels significantly decreased after exercise in both groups. In conclusion, Mg enhanced glucose availability in the peripheral and central systems, and increased lactate clearance in the muscle during exercise.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1. Schematic of a rat on the exercise treadmill with a combined auto-blood sampling and microdialysis systems.
Figure 2
Figure 2. Time profiles of the effect of Mg on the changes in glucose concentrations in the (A): blood, (B): muscle, and (C): brain.
* P<0.05 compared with the control group, (Mann-Whitney test); # P<0.05 compared with the basal levels in the control group, (Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test); § P<0.05 compared with the basal levels in the Mg group, (Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test).
Figure 3
Figure 3. Time profiles of the effect of Mg on the changes in lactate concentrations in the (A): blood, (B): muscle, and (C): brain.
* P<0.05 compared with the control group, (Mann-Whitney test); # P<0.05 compared with the basal levels in the control group, (Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test); § P<0.05 compared with the basal levels in the Mg group, (Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test).

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Grant support

This study was supported by grants from Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Providence University (TCVGH-PU-1008107), and the National Science Council (NSC-100-2113-M-075A-001-MY2), Taiwan, R.O.C. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
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