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Review
, 6 (2), 575-90

Cereal-based Gluten-Free Food: How to Reconcile Nutritional and Technological Properties of Wheat Proteins With Safety for Celiac Disease Patients

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Review

Cereal-based Gluten-Free Food: How to Reconcile Nutritional and Technological Properties of Wheat Proteins With Safety for Celiac Disease Patients

Carmela Lamacchia et al. Nutrients.

Abstract

The gluten-free diet is, to date, the only efficacious treatment for patients with Celiac Disease. In recent years, the impressive rise of Celiac Disease incidence, dramatically prompted changes in the dietary habit of an increasingly large population, with a rise in demand of gluten-free products. The formulation of gluten-free bakery products presents a formidable challenge to cereal technologists. As wheat gluten contributes to the formation of a strong protein network, that confers visco-elasticity to the dough and allows the wheat flour to be processed into a wide range of products, the preparation of cereal-based gluten-free products is a somehow difficult process. This review focuses on nutritional and technological quality of products made with gluten-free cereals available on the market. The possibility of using flour from naturally low toxic ancient wheat species or detoxified wheat for the diet of celiacs is also discussed.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Schematic representation of types and peculiarities of wheat gluten proteins (gliadins and glutenins-GS; modified from [17]).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Gluten proteins: fractions and technological properties [23].
Figure 3
Figure 3
A structural model for wheat gluten in which the HMW subunits provide a disulphide-bonded backbone that interacts with other gluten proteins by disulphide bonds (LMW subunits) and non-covalent interactions (gliadins) (modified from [26]).

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