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, 27 (11), 1318-23

[Effect of Tourniquet on Perioperative Blood Loss and Short-Term Effectiveness in Total Knee Arthroplasty]

[Article in Chinese]
Affiliations
  • PMID: 24501890

[Effect of Tourniquet on Perioperative Blood Loss and Short-Term Effectiveness in Total Knee Arthroplasty]

[Article in Chinese]
Zhe Du et al. Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi.

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effect of applying a tourniquet on perioperative blood loss and shortterm effectiveness in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Methods: A total of 94 patients (94 knees) with osteoarthritis underwent primary TKA between September 2010 and December 2011, whose data met the inclusion criteria and were retrospectively analyzed. A tourniquet was used in 51 cases (group A), no tourniquet in 43 cases (group B). There was no significant difference in gender, age, affected side, body mass index, preoperative hemoglobin (Hb) level, range of motion (ROM), visual analogue scale (VAS), Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score, Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The data were compared between 2 groups, including hematocrit (Hct), Hb, hidden blood loss, dominant blood loss, theoretical total blood loss, the operation time, hospitalization days, increasing rate of circumference length above 10 cm of the knee, VAS score, ROM, HSS score, and WOMAC score.

Results: Four cases (7.84%) of group A and 1 case (2.33%) of group B received blood transfusions, showing no significant difference (Chi(2)=1.410, P=0.235). There was no significant difference in the Hb and Hct between 2 groups at 2 days after operation (P > 0.05). The dominant blood loss of group A was significantly less than that of group B (P < 0.05), while the hidden blood loss of group A was significantly more than that of group B (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference in theoretical total blood loss between 2 groups (t=0.662, P=0.510). The operation time, hospitalization days, and VAS score at 3 days showed no significant difference between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The wound healed by first intention after operation without related complication. At 3 days after operation, the increasing rate of circumference length above 10 cm of the knee in group A was significantly higher than that of group B (t=9.435, P=0.000), but no significant difference at 7 days (t=0.462, P=0.645). At 3 and 5 days after operation, the ROM values in group B were significantly larger than those of group A (P < 0.05), but no significant difference at 7 days (t= -1.279, P=0.204). The patients were all followed up 12-18 months (mean, 14.3 months). There was no significant difference in the HSS score between 2 groups at 1 year after operation (t=0.952, P=0.344), but significant difference was found in the WOMAC score between 2 groups (t= -2.488, P=0.015). The X-ray films showed that the prosthesis was in good position, without loosening, subsidence, or osteolysis.

Conclusion: Application of a tourniquet in TKA increases hidden blood loss, and there is no obvious advantage in reducing transfusion rate compared with the non-tourniquet group, so it is recommended to reduce the time and pressure of the tourniquet for patients with high-risk of thrombosis.

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