[Epidemiological features of brain tumors]

Srp Arh Celok Lek. Nov-Dec 2013;141(11-12):823-9. doi: 10.2298/sarh1312823z.
[Article in Serbian]

Abstract

Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2.2 of all tumors, and from all cancer-related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Brain Neoplasms / epidemiology*
  • Electromagnetic Fields
  • Environmental Exposure / statistics & numerical data
  • Female
  • Glioblastoma / epidemiology*
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Male
  • Meningioma / epidemiology*
  • Middle Aged
  • Risk Factors
  • Serbia / epidemiology
  • Sex Distribution