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Clinical Trial
. 2014 Jul;260(1):23-30.
doi: 10.1097/SLA.0000000000000499.

Short-term Surgical Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate Laparoscopic and Open D3 Dissection for Stage II/III Colon Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG 0404

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Clinical Trial

Short-term Surgical Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate Laparoscopic and Open D3 Dissection for Stage II/III Colon Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG 0404

Seiichiro Yamamoto et al. Ann Surg. .

Abstract

Objective: A randomized controlled trial to confirm the non-inferiority of laparoscopic surgery to open surgery in terms of overall survival was conducted, and short-term surgical outcomes are demonstrated.

Background: The efficacy and safety outcome of laparoscopic surgery for clinical stages II/III colon cancer undergoing Japanese D3 dissection are still unclear.

Methods: Eligibility criteria included colon cancer; tumor located in the cecum, ascending, sigmoid, or rectosigmoid colon; T3 or T4 without involvement of other organs; N0-2; and M0. Patients were randomized preoperatively and underwent tumor resection with D3 dissection. Safety analyses were conducted by per-protocol set.

Results: A total of 1057 patients were randomized between October 2004 and March 2009. By per-protocol set, 524 patients who underwent open surgery and 533 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery were analyzed. D3 dissection was performed in 521 (99.4%) patients in the open surgery arm and 529 (99.2%) patients in the laparoscopic surgery arm. Conversion to open surgery was needed for 29 (5.4%) patients. Patients assigned to laparoscopic surgery had less blood loss (P < 0.001), although laparoscopic surgery lasted 52 minutes longer (P < 0.001). Laparoscopic surgery was associated with a shorter time to pass first flatus, decreased use of analgesics after 5 postoperative days, and a shorter hospital stay. Morbidity [14.3% (76/533) vs 22.3% (117/524), P < 0.001] was lower in the laparoscopic surgery arm.

Conclusions: Short-term surgical safety and clinical benefits of laparoscopic D3 dissection were demonstrated. The primary endpoint will be reported after the primary analysis, planned for 2014.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00147134.

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