Determining the involvement and therapeutic implications of host cellular factors in hepatitis C virus cell-to-cell spread

J Virol. 2014 May;88(9):5050-61. doi: 10.1128/JVI.03241-13. Epub 2014 Feb 19.

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 180 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver diseases such as fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. It has been shown that HCV can spread to naive cells using two distinct entry mechanisms, "cell-free" entry of infectious extracellular virions that have been released by infected cells and direct "cell-to-cell" transmission. Here, we examined host cell requirements for HCV spread and found that the cholesterol uptake receptor NPC1L1, which we recently identified as being an antiviral target involved in HCV cell-free entry/spread, is also required for the cell-to-cell spread. In contrast, the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) pathway, which is required for the secretion of cell-free infectious virus and thus has been identified as an antiviral target for blocking cell-free virus secretion/spread, is not required for cell-to-cell spread. Noting that HCV cell-free and cell-to-cell spread share some common factors but not others, we tested the therapeutic implications of these observations and demonstrate that inhibitors that target cell factors required for both forms of HCV spread exhibit synergy when used in combination with interferon (a representative inhibitor of intracellular HCV production), while inhibitors that block only cell-free spread do not. This provides insight into the mechanistic basis of synergy between interferon and HCV entry inhibitors and highlights the broader, previously unappreciated impact blocking HCV cell-to-cell spread can have on the efficacy of HCV combination therapies.

Importance: HCV can spread to naive cells using distinct mechanisms: "cell-free" entry of extracellular virus and direct "cell-to-cell" transmission. Herein, we identify the host cell HCV entry factor NPC1L1 as also being required for HCV cell-to-cell spread, while showing that the VLDL pathway, which is required for the secretion of cell-free infectious virus, is not required for cell-to-cell spread. While both these host factors are considered viable antiviral targets, we demonstrate that only inhibitors that block factors required for both forms of HCV entry/spread (i.e., NPC1L1) exhibit synergy when used in combination with interferon, while inhibitors that block factors required only for cell-free spread (i.e., VLDL pathway components) do not. Thus, this study advances our understanding of HCV cell-to-cell spread, provides mechanistic insight into the basis of drug synergy, and highlights inhibition of HCV spread as a previously unappreciated consideration in HCV therapy design.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Cell Line
  • Hepacivirus / physiology*
  • Hepatocytes / virology
  • Host-Pathogen Interactions*
  • Humans
  • Membrane Proteins / metabolism*

Substances

  • Membrane Proteins
  • NPC1L1 protein, human